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Part K Stairways, Ladders, Ramps and Guards

Section 2: Pedestrian and Vehicle Barriers

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Introduction

2.1 Paragraphs 2.2 to 2.9 give some guidance on good practice insofar as it relates to non-complex buildings of normal design and construction.

Pedestrian Guarding

2.2 Guarding should be provided to the sides of any part of a raised floor, gallery, balcony, roof or any other place to which people have access (unless access is only for the purpose of maintenance or repair). Guarding should also be provided to the sides of raised floors of vehicle parks in buildings, ramps used for vehicle access, sunken areas connected to buildings and any similar area where it is necessary for the safety of persons in or about a building. Guarding may not be essential where the total difference in levels is 600 mm or less. Guarding need not be provided to places such as a loading bay or a stage where it would be incompatible with normal use.

2.3 Suitable guarding would include a wall, screen (including glazing), railing, parapet or balustrade. Guarding should be at least the height shown in Diagram 6 and should be capable of resisting the force given in I.S. EN 1991-1-1 together with the Irish National Annex (taking into account the recommendations of NA.4, as necessary), and applied at the height shown.

2.4 Guarding should be provided for any window, the sill of which is more than 1400 mm above external ground level and is less than 800 mm in height above internal floor level (see Diagram 7). Where a window is capable of being opened, special care must be taken to ensure that the guarding must remain in place and effective at all times.

Diagram HK7 - Guarding design at window - Extract from TGD K
Diagram HK7 - Guarding design at window - Extract from TGD K

2.5 Guarding should be designed and built in such a way that it does not present unacceptable risks of accidents in service. Where guarding contains glazing, it should be in accordance with the recommendations of BS 6262 - 4: 2005 Glazing for Buildings - Part 4: Code of practice for safety related to human impact (see Diagram 8).

Diagram HK8 - Guarding design at window - Extract from TGD K
Diagram HK8 - Guarding design at window - Extract from TGD K

2.6 In buildings which are likely to be used by children under five years old, guarding should be so constructed that a 100 mm diameter sphere cannot pass through any openings in the guarding. Guarding should not be readily climbable and should be designed in such a way as to discourage young children from climbing it. Features in the guarding that might provide a foothold should be avoided e.g. horizontal rails etc.

Prevention of falls from windows

2.7 In dwellings where a window has an opening section through which a person may fall, (having particular regard to children under five years old), and is more than 1400 mm above external ground level, suitable safety restrictors should be provided (see Diagram 9).

Safety restrictors should restrain the window sufficiently to prevent such falls. Restrictors can be either an integral part of the window operating gear or separate items of hardware which can be fitted to a window at the time of manufacture or at installation. Restrictors should operate so that they limit the initial movement of an opening section to not more than 100 mm.

Note: Lockable handles or restrictors, which can only be released by removable keys or other tools, should not be fitted to window opening sections required for escape purposes (see TGD B Fire Safety).

Diagram HK9 - Safety restrictors - Extract from TGD K
Diagram HK9 - Safety restrictors - Extract from TGD K

Vehicle barriers

2.8 If vehicles have access to a floor, roof or ramp which forms part of a building, barriers should be provided to any edges which are level with or above the floor or ground or any other route for vehicles (see Diagram 10).

Diagram HK10 - Barrier siting - Extract from TGD K
Diagram HK10 - Barrier siting - Extract from TGD K

2.9 Any wall, parapet, balustrade or similar obstruction may serve as a barrier. Barriers should be at least the height shown in Diagram 11. Barriers should be capable of resisting the forces given in I.S. EN 1991-1-1 together with the Irish National Annex (taking into account the recommendations of NA.4, as necessary).

Diagram HK11 - Barrier design - Extract from TGD K
Diagram HK11 - Barrier design - Extract from TGD K

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